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  • Phone: +94 91 223 2585
  • info@fff.lk

Mirissa School Programme

Help us with your donation...

The newly built Mirissa School Complex provides learning facilities for 1,500 primary and secondary children. Funded and built by HEKS Swiss Interchurch Aid, RRI were engaged as project consultants to address the environmental needs of the new development.

There were several issues that needed to be addressed including: soil disturbance; erosion; blocked waterways; loss of fertile top soil due to construction work which lead to silt deposition in the surrounding paddy fields; reduction of tree-canopy cover and habitat loss; and heat radiation due to buildings and walls.

To address these issues the project was split into two phases:

1.Construction of gullies and waterways


The school has been built on a small hillock which plays a vital role in the watershed conservation of the area. Traditionally these hillocks retain water in the rainy season, slowly releasing it over the dry months into the flat planes below, providing irrigation for paddy fields and other surrounding land. These vital services were disturbed during construction and silt was being deposited in the paddy fields. Added to this, previous use of the land to grow cinnamon and rubber had depleted the soil of nutrients.


We designed and constructed new gullies and waterways, and created soil barriers and silt traps, to allow a return to the normal function of the hillocks. The system was designed to mimic a natural environment with waterfalls, streams and ponds, to provide habitat for animals. Where possible we used traditional building materials based on environmentally friendly sandstone and clay for gully construction.

Soil fertility was increased through mulching and soil conservation aided through the strategic planting of gullies, hedgerows and ground cover.


2.Habitat development


As well as planting for erosion control, our designs included shade and forest planting, utility planting (fruits and flowers) and natural wall covers to decrease solar radiation. Using Analog Forestry principles, the school grounds are now home to a number of native and indigenous plants and trees to encourage biodiversity as well as producing crops such as wild mango and rose apple that can be used in the school.


Achievements


  • Soil erosion controlled and silt free water discharged to irrigate surrounding paddy fields
  • Soil fertility and water holding capasity improoved
  • Biodiversity increased by more than 30 species
  • Micro habitats forest cover created
  • Heat radiation minimized
  • Shade and aesthetic beauty improoved to help create a safe and stimulating learing environment
======= Forest for the Future
  • Phone: +94 91 223 2585
  • info@fff.lk

Mirissa School Programme

Help us with your donation...

The newly built Mirissa School Complex provides learning facilities for 1,500 primary and secondary children. Funded and built by HEKS Swiss Interchurch Aid, RRI were engaged as project consultants to address the environmental needs of the new development.

There were several issues that needed to be addressed including: soil disturbance; erosion; blocked waterways; loss of fertile top soil due to construction work which lead to silt deposition in the surrounding paddy fields; reduction of tree-canopy cover and habitat loss; and heat radiation due to buildings and walls.

To address these issues the project was split into two phases:

1.Construction of gullies and waterways


The school has been built on a small hillock which plays a vital role in the watershed conservation of the area. Traditionally these hillocks retain water in the rainy season, slowly releasing it over the dry months into the flat planes below, providing irrigation for paddy fields and other surrounding land. These vital services were disturbed during construction and silt was being deposited in the paddy fields. Added to this, previous use of the land to grow cinnamon and rubber had depleted the soil of nutrients.


We designed and constructed new gullies and waterways, and created soil barriers and silt traps, to allow a return to the normal function of the hillocks. The system was designed to mimic a natural environment with waterfalls, streams and ponds, to provide habitat for animals. Where possible we used traditional building materials based on environmentally friendly sandstone and clay for gully construction.

Soil fertility was increased through mulching and soil conservation aided through the strategic planting of gullies, hedgerows and ground cover.


2.Habitat development


As well as planting for erosion control, our designs included shade and forest planting, utility planting (fruits and flowers) and natural wall covers to decrease solar radiation. Using Analog Forestry principles, the school grounds are now home to a number of native and indigenous plants and trees to encourage biodiversity as well as producing crops such as wild mango and rose apple that can be used in the school.


Achievements


  • Soil erosion controlled and silt free water discharged to irrigate surrounding paddy fields
  • Soil fertility and water holding capasity improoved
  • Biodiversity increased by more than 30 species
  • Micro habitats forest cover created
  • Heat radiation minimized
  • Shade and aesthetic beauty improoved to help create a safe and stimulating learing environment
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